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Leather Making in Wrexham

Leather workers at the Cambrian Leather Works, Wrexham.

Leather Making in Wrexham Gallery

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De-liming – removing lime from the skins, Cambrian Leather Works, Wrexham. © Denbighshire Archives, DD/DM/189. Hand-shaving – using a metal hand tool. © Denbighshire Archives, DD/DM/189. Leather workers at Cambrian Leather Works, Wrexham – they are bent over the working surfaces 'striking out' the skins by hand. © Denbighshire Archives, DD/DM/189. Leather workers at the Cambrian Leather Works, Wrexham. Company office and western entrance to Cambrian Leather Works, Salop Road. © Denbighshire Archives, DD/DM/189. Horse and carts used for carrying off-cuts from limed skins for disposal, Cambrian Leather Works sidings, Wrexham. © Denbighshire Archives, DD/DM/189. Caiau Sidings, Wrexham - loading the skins for transportation, chiefly to Lancashire. © Denbighshire Record Office, DD/DM/189. Leather workers at Cambrian Leather Works, Wrexham – another view inside the works. You can see how the work is divided according to gender according to the perceived abilities of men and women at that time. © Denbighshire Archives, DD/DM/189. Leather workers at Cambrian Leather Works, Wrexham – these women and girls padded the leather using agate. This process introduced a colouring agent to the skins. © Denbighshire Archives, DD/DM/189. Leather workers at Cambrian Leather Works, Wrexham – same workshop viewed from the other end. Glazing and ironing - using agate and ironing with gas irons. © Denbighshire Archives, DD/DM/189. Leather works at the Cambrian Leather Works – Finishing: the skins are made ready in this room, prior to packing for distribution and sale. © Denbighshire Archives, DD/DM/189. The packing room at Cambrian Leather Works, Salop Road. © Denbighshire Archives, DD/DM/189. Tanning pits at Cambrian Leather Works, Wrexham - the pools contain oak bark extract. © Denbighshire Archives, DD/DM/189. Abbot Leather works, Hugh Price & Co, on the left, Pentrefelin, Wrexham. © Wrexham Archives, DWL/289/2. The Zoedone Mineral Water Works. These redundant buildings were taken over by Hugh Price & Co. and converted into a leather works. Bridge Street tannery, 1907. © Wrexham Heritage Service. Hugh Price & Co.'s trade mark was 'Catch me if you can'. John Peer's tannery, Salop Road, c.1770. © The Encyclopedia of Wrexham – W. A. Wiliams. The Cambrian Leather Works, Salop Road, 1858. © The Encyclopedia of Wrexham – W. A. Wiliams. The Abbot Leather Works, Pentrefelin, Wrexham. The works were finally demolished during the redevelopment of Island Green as a retail park in the 1990s. © W.A. Williams, Bridge Books. Arkwright's cotton spinning machine. © Robert Jarvis. Cambrian Leather Works, promotional leaflet, c.1910. © Denbighshire Archives, DD/GL/216. Cambrian Leather Works, illustration in promotional leaflet, c.1910. © Denbighshire Archives, DD/GL/216. Roller leather sampler wallet, J. Meredith Jones & Sons, Wrexham. © Wrexham Heritage Service, 2010.16. A coloured drawing of the Cambrian Leather Works at its peak when in the ownership of J. Meredith Jones & Sons. © Wrexham Heritage Service, 2010.16. International Conference of Leather Trades' chemists, London, 1897. A Seymour Jones of J. Meredith Jones & Sons, Wrexham, chairman of the conference is sixth from left, front row. © Wrexham Heritage Service. Display stand, used to promote the roller leathers of J. Meredith Jones & Sons at the Tokyo International Fair, Japan, 1907. © Wrexham Heritage Service. International Conference of Leather Trades' chemists, London, 1897. A Seymour Jones of J. Meredith Jones & Sons, Wrexham, chairman of the conference is sixth from left, front row. © Wrexham Heritage Service. Leather worker or currier's knife, from Cambrian Leather Works. © Wrexham Heritage Service. A 'striker' or 'sleaker' – a leather tool used to stretch the skins and remove the tan liquor. © Wrexham Heritage Service. Site of Hugh Price & Co.'s Bridge Street tannery. This picture was taken in 2004 from St Giles' Parish Church, prior to the site being cleared by the Welsh Development Agency. © Wrexham Heritage Service/Jonathan Gammond. One of the surviving tannery buildings. Notice how the building has been designed to encourage ventilation. The remaining tannery building were demolished by the WDA as part of development project in 2004. No development has so far (2012) happened. © Wrexham Heritage Service/Jonathan Gammond.